Meet the Blazing Stars

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Midsummer in North America is, among other things, Liatris season. These gorgeous plants are often referred to as blazing stars or gayfeathers, which hints at the impact their flowers have on our psyche. Whether in the garden or in the wild, Liatris are a group of plants worth getting to know a bit better.

Liatris is by and large a North American genus with only a single species occurring in the Bahamas. Though we often think of Liatris as prairie plants, the center of diversity for this group is in the southeastern United States. Taxonomically speaking, Liatris are a bit of a conundrum. Something like 40 different species have been described and, where ranges overlap, many putative hybrids have been named.

 Rocky Mountain blazing star ( Liatris ligulistylis )

Rocky Mountain blazing star (Liatris ligulistylis)

Authorities on this group cite ample confusion when it comes to drawing lines between species. Much of this confusion comes from the fact that numerous variants and intergradations exist between the various species. As mentioned, hybridization is not uncommon in this genus, which complicates matters quite a bit.

 Prairie blazing star ( Liatris pycnostachya )

Prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya)

Liatris as a whole appears to have undergone quite an adaptive radiation in North America, with species adapting to specific soils and habitat types. Take, for instance, the case of cylindrical blazing star (L. cylindracea), marsh blazing star (L. spicata), and rough blazing star (L. aspera). The ranges of these species overlap to quite a degree, however, each prefers to grow in soils of specific texture and moisture. Marsh blazing star, as you may have guessed, prefers wetter soils whereas rough blazing star enjoys drier habitats. Cylindrical blazing star seems to enjoy intermediate soil conditions, especially where soil pH is a bit higher. As such, these three species often occur in completely different habitats. However, in places like the southern shores of Lake Michigan, they find themselves growing in close quarters and as a result, a fair amount of hybridization has occurred.

 Rough blazing star ( Liatris aspera )

Rough blazing star (Liatris aspera)

Another example of confusion comes from a species commonly known as the savanna blazing star (Liatris scariosa nieuwlandii). Many different ecotypes of this plant exist and some experts don't quite know how to deal with them all. Sometimes savanna blazing star is treated as a variant of another species called the northern blazing star (Liatris scariosa var. nieuwlandii) and sometimes it is treated as its own distinct species (Liatris nieuwlandii). Until proper genetic work can be done, it is impossible to say which, if any, are correct. 

 Glandular blazing star ( Liatris glandulosa )

Glandular blazing star (Liatris glandulosa)

Taxonomic confusion aside, the various Liatris species and variants are important components of the ecology wherever they occur. Numerous insects feed upon and raise their young on the foliage and few could argue against their flowers as pollinator magnets. All Liatris produce pink to purple flowers in splendid Asteraceae fashion. Every once in a while, an aberrant form is produced that sports white flowers. Though horticulturists have capitalized on this for the garden, at least one authority claims that these white forms are much weaker than their pink flowering parents. At least one species, the pinkscale blazing star (L. elegans), produces large, filamentous white bracts that very much resemble flowers.

 Check out the bracts on the pinkscale blazing star ( L. elegans )!

Check out the bracts on the pinkscale blazing star (L. elegans)!

Liatris are just as interesting below as they are above. The roots, foliage, and flowers all emerge from a swollen underground stem called a corm. The formation of these corms is one reason why some Liatris species have become so popular in our gardens. It makes them extremely hardy during the dormant season. In the spring, the corm starts forming roots. At the same time, tiny preformed buds at the top of the corm begin to grow this years crop of leaves and flowers. By the end of the growing season, the corm has reached its maximum size for that year and the plant draws down the rest of its reserves to wait out the winter.

 Cylindrical blazing star ( Liatris cylindracea )

Cylindrical blazing star (Liatris cylindracea)

During this time, some species form a layer of tissue along the edge of the corm that is much darker in coloration than what was laid down earlier in the season. This has led some to suggest that aging individual Liatris is possible. Experts believe that specimens can readily reach 30 to 40 years of age or more, however, the degree to which these dark bands indicate annual growth is up for a lot of debate. Others have found no correlation with plant age. Regardless, it is safe to say that many Liatris species can live for decades if left undisturbed.

 Scrub blazing star ( Liatris ohlingerae )

Scrub blazing star (Liatris ohlingerae)

All in all, Liatris is a very special, albeit slightly confusing, group of plants. It offers a little something for everyone. What's more, their beauty is only part of the story. These are ecologically important plants that support many great insect species. As summer wears on, make sure to get out there and enjoy the Liatris in your neck of the woods. You will be happy you did!

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3]