On Lynx Spiders and Pitcher Plants

On the coastal plains of southeastern North America, there exists a wide variety of pitcher plant species in the genus Sarracenia. These plants are the objects of desire for photographers, botanists, ecologists, gardeners, and unfortunately poachers. Far from simply being beautiful, these carnivores are marvels of evolution, each with their own unique ecology.

Pitcher plants are most famous for capturing and digesting insect prey but their interactions with arthropods aren't always in their favor. Browse the internet long enough and you will inevitably find photographs like this one above in which a green lynx spider (Peucetia viridans) can be seen haunting the traps of a pitcher plant. Instead of becoming prey, this is a spider that uses the pitchers to hunt.

I should start by saying this is not an obligate relationship. Lynx spiders can be found hunting on a variety of plant species. Instead, they are more accurately opportunistic robbers, stealing potential meals from the pitcher plants they hunt upon. However, what this relationship lacks in specificity, it makes up for in being really interesting. Sarracenia are not passive hunters. They do not sit and wait for insects to blindly stumble into their traps. Instead, they utilize bright colors and tasty nectar to lure insects to their demise. This is exactly what the lynx spider is using to its benefit. 

The green lynx spider does not spin a web like an orb weaver. It is an ambush predator. They have keen eyesight and will quickly pounce on any insect unfortunate enough to get too close. The reason the spider itself does not become yet another meal for the pitcher plant is because they utilize their silk as an anchor. By attaching one end to the outside of the pitcher, the can safely hunt on the trap without the risk of become prey themselves. In fact, spiders hunting on traps even go as far as to retreat down into the trap if threatened.

Photo Credit: Zachary Ambrose - nccarnivores

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