North America's Pachysandra

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In the interest of full disclosure, I have never been a fan of garden variety Pachysandra. Long before I had any interest in plants or gardening, there was something about this groundcover that simply did not appeal to me. Fast forward more than a decade and my views on the use of Asian Pachysandra in the garden have not changed much. You can imagine my surprise then when I learned that North America has its own representative of this genus - the Allegheny spurge (Pachysandra procumbens).

My introduction to P. procumbens happened during a tour of the Highlands Botanical Garden in Highlands, North Carolina. I recognized its shape and my initial reaction was alarm that a garden specializing in native plants would showcase a non-native species. My worry was quickly put to rest as the sign informed me that this lovely groundcover was in fact indigenous to this region. Indeed, P. procumbens can be found growing in shady forest soils from North Carolina down to Florida and Texas.

This species is yet another representative of a curious disjunction in major plant lineages between North America and eastern Asia. Whereas North America has this single species of Pachysandra, eastern Asia boasts two, P. axillaris and P. terminalis. Such a large gap in the distribution of this genus (as well as many others) seems a bit strange until one considered the biogeographic history of the two continents.

Many thousands of years ago, sea levels were much lower than they are today. This exposed land bridges between continents which today are hundreds of feet under water. During favorable climatic periods, Asia and North America likely shared a considerable amount of their respective floras, a fact we still find evidence of today. The Pachysandra are but one example of a once connected distribution that has been fragmented by subsequent sea level rise. Fossil records of Pachysandra have been found in regions of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, and North and South Dakota and provide further confirmation of this.

As a species, P. procumbens is considered a subshrub. It is slow growing but given time, populations can grow to impressive sizes. In spring, numerous fragrant, white flower spikes emerge that are slowly eclipsed by the flush of spring leaf growth. The flowers themselves are intriguing structures worthy of close inspection. Their robust form is what gives this genus its name. "Pachys" is Greek for thick and "andros" is Greek for male, which refers to the thickened filaments that support the anthers.

It is hard to say for sure why this species is not as popular in horticulture as its Asian cousins. It tolerates a wide variety of soil types and does well in shade. What's more, it is mostly ignored by all but the hungriest of deer. And, at the end of the day, it took this species to change my mind about Pachysandra. After all, each and every species has a story to tell.

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3]

Further Reading: [1] [2]