Ep. 228 - Plant Conservation in Action

No one has a monopoly on conservation. If we want to protect wild spaces and the species they support, we need multifaceted, collaborative approaches. Joining us to talk about plant conservation efforts in the southeast is Dr. Emily Coffey, the Vice President of Conservation & Research at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Together with a team of scientists, horticulturists, and volunteers, Dr. Coffey and her colleagues are innovating new ways to both protect and restore biodiversity in one of the most biodiverse regions in North America. Most importantly, Dr. Coffey wants you to know that we have what it takes to save the worlds plant species. All we need is the will to do it. Join us for an in depth look at what state of the art conservation looks like. This episode was produced in part by Matthew, Clark, Bobby, Kate, Steven, Brittney, McMansion Hell, Joey, Catherine, Brandon, Hall, Vegreville Creek and Wetlands Fund, Kevin, Oliver, John, Johansson, Christina, Jared, Hannah, Katy Pye, Brandon, Gwen, Carly, Stephen, Botanical Tours, Moonwort Studios, Lisa, Liba, Lucas, Mohsin Kazmi Takes Pictures, doeg, Clifton, Stephanie, Benjamin, Eli, Rachael, Anthony, Plant By Design, Philip, Brent, Ron, Tim, Homestead Brooklyn, Brodie, Kevin, Sophia, Brian, Mark, Rens, Bendix, Irene, Holly, Caitlin, Manuel, Jennifer, Sara, and Margie.

Learn more about the Southeast Center for Conservation

Learn more about plant conservation at the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Support this podcast

Pick up some In Defense of Plants merch!

Music by Moneycat

Ep. 187 - In Love With Native Plants

My guest today has fallen in love with growing native plants. Joining us is Aubree Keurajian who has just recently started her own native plant nursery in Conneticut called "Ungardening." Aubree wants to share her love of native plants with her community in an attempt to foster a better, more evolved concept of environmental stewardship through gardening. I think it is safe to say that the world needs more people like Aubree. Enjoy this audio celebration of the glory of native plants. This episode was produced in part by Carly, Stephen, Botanical Tours, Moonwort Studios, Lisa, Liba, Lucas, Mohsin Kazmi Takes Pictures, doeg, Daniel, Clifton, Stephanie, Rachelle, Benjamin, Eli, Rachael, Anthony, Plant By Design, Philip, Brent, Ron, Tim, Homestead Brooklyn, Brodie, Kevin, Sophia, Brian, Mark, Rens, Bendix, Irene, Holly, Mountain Misery Farms, Caitlin, Manuel, Jennifer, Sara, and Margie.

Follow Ungardening on Instagram

Check out Ungardening’s website

Click here to support this podcast

Music by Moneycat

Ep. 113 - Restoring Ecosystems Across the Globe

Restoration ecology is a topic near and dear to my heart. The idea of nursing the land back to health is something we all must rally behind. Plants are at the center of this practice and our guest today has devoted his career to understanding both plant diversity and how to restore their populations following human disturbance. Joining us from western Australia is Dr. Kingsley Dixon. Restoration is quite challenging in this harsh landscape but the lessons Dr. Dixon has learned over the years is being used to improve restoration projects around the globe. This is one episode you do not want to miss! This episode was produced in part by Mark, Allen, Desiree, Sienna & Garth, Laura, Margie, Troy, Sara, Jennifer, Christopher, Manuel, Daniel, John, Rosanna, Mary Jane, and Caitlin. 

Click here to learn more about Dr. Dixon's work

Click here to support this podcast

Music by Moneycat

Ep. 87 - Fire in the Forest

I have been thinking about fire a lot these days. In the wake of recent forest fires in the southeast, I wanted to take a closer look at what fires mean for ecosystems other than prairies. To do this, I sat down with my good friend and lab mate, Tyler Refsland, to discuss the implications of fire in forest ecosystems. Tyler's work is based in the oak-hickory forests of southern Illinois and takes a unique perspective that spans many scales, from mycorrhizal fungi, to individual trees, and up to forest composition as a whole. Although this isn't an all encompassing look at the role of fire in ecosystems, it nonetheless offers a lot of food for thought. This episode was produced in part by Mark, Allen, Maz, Beccah, Desiree, Sienna, Laura, Margie, Troy, and Bryan.

You can reach Tyler via email: refslan2@illinois.edu

Click here to support this podcast

Music by Moneycat

Ep. 50 - Restoration Ecology with Author Paddy Woodworth

Restoration ecology represents a juxtaposition between science, the public, and human values. It is often a hot button topic full of strong and sometimes contentious opinions. The practice itself offers humanity a chance to regain what has been lost, to right at least some of our environmental wrongs. Whereas the science of restoration is in its infancy, the effort has been ongoing, sometimes for decades. Author Paddy Woodworth has written a wonderful book on the subject called "Our Once and Future Planet." He joins us for a thoughtful discussion regarding what he has learned about the subject after a decade of investigating it. As you will hear, he demonstrates just how complex the very idea of restoration can be, especially in a century of rapidly changing climate. This episode was produced in part by Allan of Kenosha, WI. 

Click here to pick up your own copy of "Our Once and Future Planet."

Click here to learn more about Paddy Woodworth

Click here to support this podcast

Music by Moneycat