Twinspurs & Their Pollinators

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Garden centers and nurseries always have something to teach me. Though I am largely a native plant gardener, the diversity of plant life offered up for sale is always a bit mind boggling. Perusing the shelves and tables of myriad cultivars and varieties, I inevitably encounter something new and interesting to investigate. That is exactly how I came to learn about the twinspurs (Diascia spp.) and their peculiar floral morphology. Far from being simply beautiful, these herbaceous plants have evolved an interesting relationship with a small group of bees.

Diascia whiteheadii

Diascia whiteheadii

The genus Diascia comprises roughly 70 species and resides in the family Scrophulariaceae. They are native to a decent chunk of southern Africa and have adapted to a range of climate conditions. Most are annuals but some have evolved a perennial habit. The reason these plants caught my eye was not the bright pinks and oranges of their petals but rather the two spurs that hang off the back of each bloom. Those spurs felt like a bit of a departure from other single-spurred flowers that I am used to so I decided to do some research. I fully expected them to be a mutation that someone had selectively bred into these plants, however, that is not the case. It turns out, those two nectar spurs are completely natural and their function in the pollination ecology of these plants is absolutely fascinating.

Diascia rigescens

Diascia rigescens

Not all Diascia produce dual spurs on each flower but a majority of them do. The spurs themselves can vary in length from species to species, which has everything to do with their specific pollinator. The inside of each spur is not filled with nectar as one might expect. Instead, the walls are lined with strange trichomes and that secrete an oily substance. It’s this oily substance that is the sole reward for visiting Diascia flowers.

Diascia megathura  (a) inflorescenc with arrows indicating spurs and (b) cross sectioned spur showing the trichomes secreting oil (Photos: G. Gerlach).

Diascia megathura (a) inflorescenc with arrows indicating spurs and (b) cross sectioned spur showing the trichomes secreting oil (Photos: G. Gerlach).

If you find yourself looking at insects in southern Africa, you may run into a genus of bees called Rediviva whose females have oddly proportioned legs. The two front legs of Rediviva females are disproportionately long compared to the rest of their legs. They look a bit strange compared to other bees but see one in action and you will quickly understand what is going on. Rediviva bees are the sole pollinators of Diascia flowers. Attracted by the bright colors, the bees alight on the flower and begin probing those two nectar spurs with each of their long front legs.

A female  Rediviva longimanus  with its long forelegs.

A female Rediviva longimanus with its long forelegs.

If you look closely at each front leg, you will notice that they are covered in specialized hairs. Those hairs mop up the oily secretions from within each spur and the bee then transfers the oils to sacs on their hind legs. What is even more amazing is that each flower seems to have entered into a relationship with either a small handful or even a single species of Rediviva bee. That is why the spur lengths differ from species to species - each one caters to the front leg length of each species of Rediviva bee. It is worth noting that at least a few species of Diascia are generalists and are visited by at least a couple different bees. Still, the specificity of this relationship appears to have led to reproductive isolation among many populations of these plants, no doubt lending to the diversity of Diascia species we see today.

Diascia  'Coral Belle'

Diascia 'Coral Belle'

The female bees do not eat the oils they collect. Instead, they take them back to their brood chambers, feed them to their developing offspring, and use what remains to line their nests. At this point it goes without saying that if Diascia were to disappear, so too would these bees. It is incredible to think of the myriad ways that plants have tricked their pollinators into giving up most, if not all of their attention to a single type of flower. Also, I love the fact that a simple trip to a garden center unlocked a whole new world of appreciation for a group of pretty, little bedding plants. It just goes to show you that plants have so much more to offer than just their beauty.

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3] [4]

The Intriguing Pollination of a Central American Anthurium

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As an avid gardener of both indoors and out, there are few better experiences than getting to see familiar plants growing in the wild for the first time. That experience is made all the better when you find out new and interesting facts about their ecology. On a recent trip to Costa Rica, I was introduced to a wide variety of Anthurium species. I marveled at how amazing these plants look in situ and was taken aback to learn that many produce flowers with intoxicating aromas.

I was also extremely fortunate to be in the presence of some aroid experts during this trip and their knowledge fueled my interest in getting up close and personal with what little time I had with these plants. They were able to ID the plants and introduce me to their biology. One species in particular has been the subject of interest in an ongoing pollination study that has proven to be unique.

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The plant in question is known scientifically as Anthurium acutifolium and it is rather charming once you get to know it. It is a terrestrial plant with relatively large leaves for its overall size. Its range includes portions of lowland Costa Rica and Panama. Its flowers are typical of what one would expect out of this family. They are fused into a type of inflorescence known as a spadix and can range in color from white to green and occasionally red. If you are lucky to visit the spadix between roughly 8:00 AM and 12:30 PM, you may notice a rich scent that, to me, is impossible to describe in words.

It's this scent that sets the stage for pollination in this species. During some down time, University of Vienna grad student Florian Etl discovered that the spadix of A. acutifolium was getting a lot of attention from a particular species of small bee. Closer inspection revealed that they were all males of a species of oil-collecting bee known as Paratetrapedia chocoensis. Now, the females of these oil collecting bees are well known in the pollination literature. They visit flowers that secrete special oils that the females then use to build nests and feed their young. This is why the attention from male bees was so intriguing.

A: A male  P. chocoensis  bee approaching a scented spadix of an inflorescence of  A. acutifolium . B: The abdominal mopping behavior of male  P. chocoensis  oil bees on a spadix. C: Ventral side of the abdomen of a male  P.chocoensis  covered with pollen. D: A male  P. chocoensis  bee on a spadix of an inflorescence of  A. acutifolium , touching the pollen shedding anthers. E: Pubescent region pressed on the surface of  A. acutifolium  during the mopping behavior. F: A scented inflorescence of  A. acutifolium  with three male  P. chocoensis  individuals. G: Image of the abdomen of a male  P.chocensis  in lateral view showing the conspicuous pubescent region. ( SOURCE )

A: A male P. chocoensis bee approaching a scented spadix of an inflorescence of A. acutifolium. B: The abdominal mopping behavior of male P. chocoensis oil bees on a spadix. C: Ventral side of the abdomen of a male P.chocoensis covered with pollen. D: A male P. chocoensis bee on a spadix of an inflorescence of A. acutifolium, touching the pollen shedding anthers. E: Pubescent region pressed on the surface of A. acutifolium during the mopping behavior. F: A scented inflorescence of A. acutifolium with three male P. chocoensis individuals. G: Image of the abdomen of a male P.chocensis in lateral view showing the conspicuous pubescent region. (SOURCE)

Males would land on the spadix and begin rubbing the bottom of their abdomen along its surface. In doing so, they inevitably picked up and deposited pollen. To date, such behavior was unknown among male oil bees. What exactly were these male bees up to?

As it turns out, the males were collecting fragrances. Close inspection of their morphology revealed that each male has a small patch of dense hairs underneath their abdomen. The males are definitely not after fatty oils or nectar as A. acutifolium does not secrete either of these substances. Instead, it would appear that the male oil bees are there to collect scent, which is mopped up by that dense patch of hairs. Even more remarkable is the fact that in order to properly collect these fragrance compounds, the bees are likely using solvents that they have collected from other flowering plant species around the forest.

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What they are doing with these scent compounds remains a mystery but some potential clues lie in another scent/pollination system. Male orchid bees perform similar scent-collecting activities in order to procure unique scent bouquets. Though the exact function of their scent collecting is not known either, we do know that these scents are used in the process of finding and procuring mates. It is likely that these male oil bees are using them in a similar way.

Taken together, these data suggest that a very specific pollination syndrome involving A. acutifolium and male oil bees has evolved in Central American forests. No other insects were observed visiting the flowers of A. acutifolium and the scents only ever attracted males of these specific oil bees during the hours in which the spadix was actively producing the compounds. This is a remarkable pollination syndrome and one that encourages us to start looking elsewhere in the forest. This, my friends, is why there is no substitute for simply taking the time to observe nature. We must take the time to get outside and poke around because we stand to miss out on so much of what makes our world tick and without such knowledge, we risk losing so much. 

Photo Credits: Florian Etl [1]

Further Reading: [1]

On the Ecology of Krameria

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There is something satisfying about saying "Krameria." Whereas so many scientific names act as tongue twisters, Krameria rolls of the tongue with a satisfying confidence. What's more, the 18 or so species within this genus are fascinating plants whose lifestyles are as exciting as their overall appearance. Today I would like to give you an overview of these unique parasitic plants.

Commonly known as rhatany, these plants belong to the family Krameriaceae. This is a monotypic clade, containing only the genus Krameria. Historically there has been a bit of confusion as to where these plants fit on the tree of life. Throughout the years, Krameria has been placed in families like Fabaceae and Polygalaceae, however, more recent genetic work suggests it to be unique enough to warrant a family status of its own. 

Regardless of its taxonomic affiliation, Krameria is a wonderfully specialized genus of plants with plenty of offer the biologically curious among us. All 18 species are shrubby, though at least a couple species can sometimes barely qualify as such. They are a New World taxon with species growing native as far south as Paraguay and Chile and as far north as Kansas and Colorado. They generally inhabit dry habitats.

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As I briefly mentioned above, most if not all of the 18 species are parasitic in nature. They are what we call "hemiparasites" in that despite stealing from their hosts, they are nonetheless fully capable of photosynthesis. It is interesting to note that no one has yet been able to raise these plants in captivity without a host. It would seem that despite being able to photosynthesize, these plants are rather specialized parasites. 

That is not to say that they have evolved to live off of a specific host. Far from it actually. A wide array of potential hosts, ranging from annuals to perennials, have been identified. What I find most remarkable about their parasitic lifestyle is the undeniable advantage it gives these shrubs in hot, dry environments. Research has found that despite getting a slow start on growing in spring, the various Krameria species are capable of performing photosynthesis during extremely stressful periods and for a much longer duration than the surrounding vegetation. 

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The reason for this has everything to do with their parasitic lifestyle. Instead of producing a long taproot to reach water reserves deep in the soil, these shrubs invest in a dense layer of lateral roots that spread out in the uppermost layers of soil seeking unsuspecting hosts. When these roots find a plant worth parasitizing, they grow around its roots and begin taking up water and nutrients from them. By doing this, Krameria are no longer limited by what water or other resources their roots can find. Instead, they have managed to tap into large reserves that would otherwise be locked away inside the tissues of their neighbors. As such, the Krameria do not have to worry about water stress in the same way that non-parasitic plants do. 

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By far the most stunning feature of the genus Krameria are the flowers. Looking at them it is no wonder why they have been associated with legumes and milkworts. They are beautiful and complex structures with a rather specific pollination syndrome. Krameria flowers produce no nectar to speak of. Instead, they have evolved alongside a group of oil-collecting bees in the genus Centris.

One distinguishing feature of Krameria flowers are a pair of waxy glands situated on each side of the ovary. These glands produce oils that female Centris bees require for reproduction. Though Centris bees are not specialized on Krameria flowers, they nonetheless visit them in high numbers. Females alight on the lip and begin scraping off oils from the glands. As they do this, they inevitably come into contact with the stamens and pistil. The female bees don't feed on these oils. Instead, they combine it with pollen and nectar from other plant species into nutrient-rich food packets that they feed to their developing larvae.  

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Following fertilization, seeds mature inside of spiny capsules. These capsules vary quite a bit in form and are quite useful in species identification. Each spine is usually tipped in backward-facing barbs, making them excellent hitchhikers on the fur and feathers of any animal that comes into contact with them.  

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3] [4]