Hydatellaceae: The Other Basal Angiosperms

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Though rather obscure to most of the world, the genus Trithuria has enjoyed somewhat of a celebrity status in recent years. A paper published in 2007 lifted this tiny group of minuscule aquatic plants out of their spot in Poales and granted them a place among the basal angiosperm lineage Nymphaeales. This was a huge move for such little plants. 

The genus Trithuria contains 12 species, the majority of which reside in Australia, however, two species, T. inconspicua and T. konkanensis, are native to New Zealand and India. They are all aquatic herbs and their diminutive size and inconspicuous appearance make them easy to miss. For quite some time these odd plants were considered to be a group of highly reduced monocots. Their original placement was in the family Centrolepidaceae. All of that changed in 2007.

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Close inspection of Trithuria DNA told a much different story. These were not highly reduced monocots after all. Instead, multiple analyses revealed that Trithuria were actually members of the basal angiosperm lineage Nymphaeales. Together with the water lilies (Nymphaeaceae) and the fanworts (Cabombaceae), these plants are living representatives of some of the early days in flowering plant evolution. 

Of course, DNA analysis cannot stand on its own. The results of the new phylogeny had to be corroborated with anatomical evidence. Indeed, closer inspection of the anatomy of Trithuria revealed that these plants are truly distinct from members of Poales based on a series of features including furrowed pollen grains, inverted ovules, and abundant starchy seed storage tissues. Taken together, all of these lines of evidence warranted the construction of a new family - Hydatellaceae.

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The 12 species of Trithuria are rather similar in their habits. Many live a largely submerged aquatic lifestyle in shallow estuarine habitats. As you may have guessed, individual plants look like tiny grass-like rosettes. Their small flower size has lent to some of their taxonomic confusion over the years. What was once thought of as individual flowers were revealed to be clusters or heads of highly reduced individual flowers. 

Reproduction for these plants seems like a tricky affair. Some have speculated that water plays a role but close inspections of at least one species revealed that very little pollen transfer takes place in this way. Wind is probably the most common way in which pollen from one plant finds its way to another, however, the reduced size of these flowers and their annual nature means there isn't much time and pollen to go around. It is likely that most of the 12 species of Trithuria are self-pollinated. This is probably quite useful considering the unpredictable nature of their aquatic habitats. It doesn't take much for these tiny aquatic herbs to establish new populations. In total, Trithuria stands as living proof that big things often come in small packages. 

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3]

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3]

 

Resin Midges, Basal Angiosperms, and a Strange Pollination Syndrome

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When we try to talk about clades that are "basal" or "sister" to large taxonomic groups, your average listener either consciously or unconsciously thinks "primitive." Primitive has connotations of something that under-developed or unfinished. This is simply not the case. Take, for instance, a family of basal angiosperms called Schisandraceae.

This family is nestled within the order Austrobaileyales, which, along with a small handful of other families, represent the earliest branches of the angiosperm family tree still alive today.  To call them primitive, however, would be a serious misnomer. Because they diverged so early on, these lineages represent serious success stories in flowering plant evolution, having survived for hundreds of millions of years. Instead, we must think of them as fruitful early experiments in angiosperm evolution.

Floral morphology of and interaction between midge and their larvae (white arrows) in Illicium dunnianum

Still, the proverbial proof is in the pudding and if there was any sort of physical evidence one could put forth to remove our hierarchical prejudices about the taxonomic position of these plants, it would have to be their bizarrely specific pollination syndromes.  Members of the family Schisandraceae have entered into intense relationships with a group of flies known as midges and their interactions are anything but primitive. 

We will start with two species of plant native throughout parts of Asia. Meet as Illicium dunnianum and Illicium tsangii. More will be familiar with this genus than they may realize as Illicium gives us the dreaded star anise flavor our grandparents liked to sneak into our cookies as kids (but I digress). These particular species, however, have more to offer the world than flavoring. They are also very important plants for a group of gall midges in the genus Clinodiplosis.

The midges cannot reproduce without I. dunnianum or I. tsangii. You see, these midges lay their eggs within the flowers of these plants and, in doing so, end up pollinating them in the process. At first glance it may seem like a very one-sided relationship. Female midges deposit their eggs all along the carpels packed away inside large, fleshy whorl of tepals. As the midges crawl all over the reproductive organs looking for a suitable place to lay, they inevitably pick up and deposit pollen. 

Floral morphology and interaction between midge larvae (white arrows) in  Illicium tsangii

This is not the end of this relationship though. After eggs have been deposited, something strange happens to the Illicium flowers. For starters, they develop nursery chambers around the midge larvae. Additionally, their tepals begin producing heat. Enough heat is produced to keep the nursery chamber temperature significantly warmer than the ambient air temperature. What's more flower heating intensifies throughout the duration of fruit development. It was originally hypothesized that this heating had something to do with floral odor volatilization and seed incubation, however, experiments have shown that at least seed development in these two shrubs is not influenced by floral heat in any major way. The same cannot be said for the midge larvae. 

As the flowers mature and give way to developing seeds, the midge larvae are hard at work feeding on tiny bits of the flowers themselves. When researchers looked at midge larvae development on these Illicium species, they found that they were completely dependent upon the floral heat for survival. Any significant drop in temperature caused them to die. Essentially, the plants appear to be producing heat more for the midges than for themselves. It may seem odd that these two plants would invest so much energy to heat their flowers so that midge larvae feeding on their tissues can survive but such face-value opinions rarely stand in ecology.

One must not forget that those larvae grow up to be adult midges that will go on to pollinate the Illicium flowers the following season. Although the plants are taking a bit of a hit by allowing the larvae to develop within their tissues, they are nonetheless ensuring that enough pollinators will be around to repeat the process again. If that wasn't cool enough, the relationship between each of these plants and their pollinators are rather specific and the authors of at least one paper believe that the midges that pollinate each species are new to science. 

Now, if I haven't managed to convince you that this angiosperm sister lineage is anything but primitive, then let's take a look at another genus within the family Schisandraceae that have taken this midge pollination syndrome to the next level. This story also takes place in Asia but instead involves a genus of woody vines known as Kadsura

Like the Illicium we mentioned earlier, a handful of Kadsura species rely on midges for pollination. The way in which they go about maintaining this relationship is a bit more involved. The midges that are attracted by Kadsura flowers are known as resin midges and their larvae live off of plant resins. The flowers of Kadsura are another story entirely. They are as odd as they are beautiful. 

Flowers, pollinators ,and their larvae (white arrows) in  Kadsura heteroclita .

Flowers, pollinators ,and their larvae (white arrows) in Kadsura heteroclita.

In male flowers, stamens are arranged in dense, cone-like structures called androecia whereas the female flowers contain a compact shield-like structure with the uppermost part of the stigma barely emerging. This is called a gynoecium. Even weirder, the male flowers of one particularly strange species, Kadsura coccinea, produce large, swollen inner tepals. 

Once Kadsura flowers begin to open, visiting midges are not far behind. Male flowers seem to attract more midges than female flowers and it is thought that this has to do with varying amounts of special attractant chemicals produced by the flowers themselves. Regardless, midges set to work exploring the blooms with males looking for mates and females looking for a place to lay their eggs. 

When a suitable spot has been found, females will deposit their eggs into the floral tissues with their ovipositor. The wounded plant tissues immediately begin producing resin, not unlike a wounded pine tree. In the case of K. coccinea, it would appear that the oddly swollen tepals are specifically targeted by female midges for egg laying. They too produce resin upon having eggs laid within. 

The oddball flowers of Kadsura coccinea showing swollen tepals.

The function of plant resins in many cases are to fight off pathogens. From beetles to fungi, resin helps plug up and seal off wounds. This does not seem to be the case in the Kadsura-midge relationship though. The so-called "brood chambers" within the floral tissues go on producing resin for upwards of 6 days after the midge eggs were laid. Eventually the floral parts whither and drop off but the midge larvae seem to be quite happy in their resin-filled homes. 

As it turns out, the resin midge larvae feed on the viscous resin as their sole food source. Instead of trying to ward off these pesky little insects, the plants seem to be encouraging them to raise their offspring within! Just as we saw in the Asian Illicium, these Kadsura vines seem to be providing brood sites for their pollinators. Also, just as the Illicium-midge relationship thought to be species specific, each species of Kadsura appears to have its own specific species of resin midge pollinator! K. coccinea even goes as far as to produce tepals specifically geared towards raising midge larvae, thus keeping them away from their more valuable reproductive organs. In return for the nursery service, Kadsura have their pollinators all to themselves.

Pollination mutualisms in which plants trade raising larvae for pollen transfer are extremely derived and some of the most specialize plant/animal interactions on the planet. To find such relationships in these basal or sister lineages is living proof that these plants are anything but primitive. In the energy-reproductive investment trade-off, it appears that ensuring ample pollinator opportunities far outweighs the cost of providing them with nursery chambers. It is remarkable to think just how intertwined the relationships between these plants and there pollinators truly are. Take that, plant taxonomic prejudices! 

Photo Credits: [1] [2]

Further Reading: [1] [2] 

 

Mighty Magnolias

Magnolias are one of those trees that even the non-botanically minded among us will easily recognize. They are one of the more popular plant groups grown as ornamentals and their symbolism throughout human history is quite interesting. But, for all this attention, few may realize how special magnolias really are. Did you know they they are one of the most ancient flowering plant lineages in existence?

Magnolias first came on to the scene somewhere around 95 million years ago. Although they are not representative of what the earliest flowering plants may have looked like, they do offer us some interesting insights into the evolution of flowers. To start with, the flower bud is enclosed in bracts (modified leaves) instead of more differentiated sepals. The "petals" themselves are not actually petals but tepals, which are also undifferentiated. The most striking aspect of magnolia flower morphology is in the actual reproductive structures themselves.

Magnolias evolved before there were bees. Because of this, the basic structure that makes them unique was in place long before bees could work as a selective pressure in pollination. Beetles are the real pollinators of magnolia flowers. The flowers have a hardened carpel to avoid damage by their gnawing mandibles as the feed. The beetles are after the protein-rich pollen. Because the beetles are interesting in pollen and pollen alone, the flowers mature in a way that ensures cross pollination. The male parts mature first and offer said pollen. The female parts of the flower are second to mature. They produce no reward for the beetles but are instead believed to mimic the male parts, ensuring that the beetles will spend some time exploring and thus effectively pollinating the flowers.

It is pretty neat to think that you don't necessarily have to track down a dawn redwood or a gingko to see a plant that has survived major extinction events. You can find magnolias very close to home with a keen eye. Looking at one, knowing that this is a piece of biology that has worked for millennia, is quite astounding in my opinion.

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Anise: An Angiosperm Success Story

Illicium floridanum

Illicium floridanum

I must admit there are few flavors I loath more than anise (and consequently licorice and fennel). Regardless of the flavor, I nonetheless find myself enamored by their whorled seed capsules of star anise. In an attempt to reconcile my feelings towards anise in a culinary sense, I decided to get to know the plants that are responsible for it and I am so glad that I did. As it turns out, this group of small trees and shrubs offer us a glimpse at some of the earliest branchings on the angiosperm family tree.

We get star anise from the genus Illicium. Native to humid tropical understories, there are roughly 40 species scattered around southeast Asia, southeastern North America, the Caribbean, and parts of Mexico. Molecular as well as fossil evidence suggests this group diverged during the mid to late Cretaceous, not long after flowering plants came onto the scene. Indeed, along with Amborella and Nymphaeales, Illicium represent the three lineages that are sister to all other flowering plants alive today.

Illicium henryi

Illicium henryi

To call them primitive, however, would be a serious misnomer. Because they diverged so early on, these lineages represent serious success stories in flowering plant evolution. Instead, think of them as fruitful early experiments in angiosperm evolution. Illicium has characteristics that set it out as being sister to all other flowering plants. For instance, the vascular tissues more closely resemble those of gymnosperms than they do angiosperms. Also, like the other sister angiosperms, Illicium blur the line between the long standing categories of monocot and eudicot. As such, they are sometimes referred to as "paleoherbs." Another key diagnostic feature lies in their floral morphology.

They don't have what could be considered true petals or sepals. Instead, they have whorls of tepals, which start off sepal-like and gradually become more petal-like as you near the center of the flower. The stamens, which are laminar or leaf-like, are also arranged in a dense whorl surrounding a yet another whorl of fused carpels. Once fertilized, each carpel gives rise to a hard, glossy seed. As the carpels mature and begin to dry, the individual capsules get tighter and tighter until at some point the seed is pinched so hard that it is ejected from a slit in the fruit in projectile fashion.

Illicium verum

Illicium verum

Although this research will never rectify the taste of this spice, it nonetheless has given me a new found respect and sense of awe for this genus. To look upon the fruit of Illicium is to look at a biological structure that has stood the test of time. These plants are evolutionary successes that should be admired for their unique place in the story of flowering plant evolution.

Photo Credits: Scott Zona and Tim Waters

Further Reading: [1]