From Herbivore to Pollinator Thanks to a Parasitoid

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In the Atlantic forests of Brazil resides a small orchid known scientifically as Dichaea cogniauxiana. Like most plant species, this orchid experiences plenty of pressure from herbivores. It faces rather intense pressures from two species of weevil in the genus Montella. These weevils are new to science and have yet been given full species status. What's more, they don't appear to eat the leaves of D. cogniauxiana. Instead, female weevils lay eggs in the developing fruits and the larvae hatch out and consume the seeds within. In other words, they treat the fruits like a nursery chamber.

This is where this relationship gets interesting. You see, the weevils themselves appear to take matters into their own hands. Instead of waiting to find already pollinated orchids, an event that can be exceedingly rare in the dense Amazonian forests, these weevils go about pollinating the orchids themselves. Females have been observed picking up orchid pollinia and depositing the pollen onto the stigmas. In this way, they ensure that there will be developing fruits in which they can raise their young.

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Left unchecked, the weevil larvae readily consume all of the developing seeds within the pod, an unfortunate blow to the reproductive efforts of this tiny orchid. However, the situation changes when parasitoid wasps enter the mix. The wasps are also looking for a place to rear their young but the wasp larvae do not eat orchid seeds. Instead, the wasps must find juicy weevil larvae in which to lay their eggs. When the wasp larvae hatch out, they eat the weevil larvae from the inside out and this is where things get really interesting.

The wasp larvae develop at a much faster rate than do the weevil larvae. As such, they kill the weevil long before it has a chance to eat all of the orchid seeds. By doing so, the wasp has effectively rescued the orchids reproductive effort. Over a five year period, researchers based out of the University of Campinas found that orchid fruits in which wasp larvae have killed off the weevil larvae produced nearly as many seeds as uninfected fruits. As such, the parasitoid wasps have made effective pollinators out of otherwise destructive herbivorous weevils.

The fact that a third party (in this case a parasitic wasp) can change a herbivore into an effective pollinator is quite remarkable to say the least. It reminds us just how little we know about the intricate ways in which species interact and form communities. The authors note that even though pollination in this case represents selfing and thus reduced genetic diversity, it nonetheless increases the reproductive success of an orchid that naturally experiences low pollination rates to begin with. In the hyper diverse and competitive world of Brazilian rainforests, even self-pollination cab be a boost for this orchid.

Photo Credits: [1] [2]

Further Reading: [1]

On Crickets and Seed Dispersal

The world of seed dispersal strategies is fascinating. Since the survival of any plant species requires that its seed find a suitable place to germinate, it is no wonder then that there are myriad ways in which plants disseminate their propagules. Probably my favorite strategies to ponder are those involving diplochory. Diplochory is a fancy way of saying that seed dispersal involves two or more dispersal agents. Probably the most obvious to us are those that utilize fruit. For example, any time a bird eats a fruit and poops out the seeds elsewhere, diplochory has happened.

Less familiar but equally as cool forms of diplochory involve insect vectors. We have discussed myrmecochory (ant dispersal) in the past as well as a unique form of dispersal in which seeds mimic animal dung and are dispersed by dung beetles. But what about other insects? Are there more forms of insect seed dispersal out there? Yes there are. In fact, a 2016 paper offers evidence of a completely overlooked form of insect seed dispersal in the rainforests of Brazil. The seed dispersers in this case are crickets.

Yes, you read that correctly - crickets. Crickets have been largely ignored as potential seed dispersers. Most are omnivores that eat everything from leaves to seeds and even other insects. One report from New Zealand showed that a large species of cricket known as the King weta can disperse viable seeds in its poop after consuming fruits. However, this is largely thought to be incidental. Despite this, few plant folk have ever considered looking at this melodic group of insects... until now. 

The team who published the paper noticed some interesting behavior between crickets and seeds of plants in the family Marantaceae. Plants in this group attach a fleshy structure to their seeds called an aril. The function of this aril is to attract potential seed dispersers. By offering up seeds from various members of the family, the research team were able to demonstrate that seed dispersal by crickets in this region is quite common. Even more astounding, they found that at least six different species of cricket were involved in removing seeds from the study area. What's more, these crickets only ate the aril, leaving the seed behind.

The question of whether this constitutes effective seed dispersal remains to be seen. Still, this research suggests some very interesting things regarding crickets as seed dispersal agents. Not only did the crickets in this study remove the same amount of seeds as ants, they also removed larger seeds and took them farther than any ant species. Since only the aril is consumed, such behavior can seriously benefit large-seeded plants. Also, whereas ant seed dispersal occurs largely during daylight hours, cricket dispersal occurs mostly at night, thus adding more resolution to the story of seed dispersal in these habitats. I am very interested to see if this sort of cricket/seed interaction happens elsewhere in the world.

Photo Credits: [1] [2]

Further Reading: [1]

 

New Plant Species Discovered on Facebook

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There are many downsides to the amount of time some of us spend on the internet but there is no denying that there are some incredible benefits as well. Never before in human history has information been so readily available to so many people. Without Facebook, In Defense of Plants would not have anywhere near the platform from which I can interact with all of you wonderful plant folk. In what may be one of the coolest uses of social media to date, a new species of carnivorous plant has been discovered using Facebook! 

While exploring a mountain top in Brazil, amateur researcher  Reginaldo Vasconcelos snapped a few shots of a large sundew. Upon returning home, the pictures were uploaded to Facebook for the world to see. It didn't take long for scientists to notice that the plant in the picture was something quite special. 

Indeed, what Vasconcelos had photographed was a species of Drosera completely new to science! This is the first time that a new species has been discovered using social media. Experts have now published the first scientific description of this species. It has been named Drosera magnifica - the magnificent sundew. 

And magnificent it is! According to the authors of the paper, "It is the largest sundew in the Americas, and the second-largest carnivorous plant in the Americas. In this respect it is also a spectacular plant.” The plant was discovered in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Oddly enough, the mountain on which it was found is readily accessible. How this species went undiscovered for so long is quite a mystery. It just goes to show you how little we know about the world we live in. 

That sad part about this discovery is that the mountain it is endemic to is surrounded by cattle ranches as well as coffee and eucalyptus plantations. The future of this brand new species is by no means certain. Researchers have already elevated its status to critically endangered. Unless other populations are found, this species may disappear not long after its discovery. 

Photo Credit: Paulo Gonella

Further Reading:

http://www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/content/2015/f/p00220p267f.pdf