The Smallest of the Giants

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There are a lot of cool ways to discover a new species but what about tripping over one? That is exactly how Rafflesia consueloae was found. Researchers from the University of the Philippines Los Baños were walking through the forest back in 2014 when one of them tripped over something. To their surprise, it was the bloom of a strange parasitic plant.

This was an exciting discovery because it meant that that strange family of holoparasitic plants called Rafflesiaceae just got a little bit bigger. Rafflesiaceae is famous the world over for the size of its flowers. Whereas the main body of plants in this family consists of tiny thread-like structures living within the tissues of forest vines, the flowers of many are huge. In fact, with a flower 3 feet (1 meter) in diameter, which can weigh as much as 24 lbs. (11 kg), Rafflesia arnoldii  produces the largest flower on the planet. This new species of Rafflesia, however, is a bit of a shrimp compared to its cousins.

In fact, R. consueloae produces the smallest flowers of the genus. Of the individuals that have been found, the largest flower clocked in at 3.83 inches (9.37 cm) in diameter. Needless to say, this was an exciting discovery and those responsible for it quickly set about observing the plant in detail. Cameras were set up to monitor flower development as well as to keep track of any animals that might pay it a visit. It turns out that, like its cousins, R. consueloae appears to be a specialist parasite on a group of vines in the genus Tetrastigma.

One of the unique characteristics of R. consueloae, other than its size, is the fact that its flowers don’t seem to produce any noticeable scent. This is a bit odd considering that its cousins are frequently referred to as “corpse flowers” thanks to the fact that they both look and smell like rotting meat. That is not to say that this species produces no scent at all. In fact, researchers noted that the fruits of R. consueloae smell a bit like coconut.

Its discoverers were quick to note that the discovery of such a strange parasitic plant in this particular stretch of forest is exciting because of the state of disrepair the forest is in. This region has suffered heavily from deforestation and fragmentation and it has long been thought that such specialized parasites like those in the genus Rafflesia could not persist after logging. As such, this discovery offers at least some hope that they may not be as sensitive as we once thought. Still, that does not mean that R. consueloae is by any means secure in its future.

To date, R. consueloae has only been found growing in two localities in Pantabangan, Phillippines. Though it is possible that more populations will be found growing elsewhere, its limited distribution nonetheless places it at high risk for extinction. Further habitat loss and the potential for anthropogenic forest fires are considerable threats to these plants and the hosts they simply can’t live without.

Despite plenty of observation, no one is quite sure how this species manages to reproduce successfully. Individual flowers are said to be either male or female but without a scent, its hard to say who or what pollinates them. Similarly, it still remains a mystery as to how R. consueloae (or any of its relatives for that matter) accomplish seed dispersal. Some small mammals were seen feeding on fruits but what happens after that is anyone’s guess. It seems like the various Rafflesiaceae still have many mysteries to be solved.

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