The Carnivorous Waterwheel


Bladderworts (Utricularia spp.) aren't the only carnivorous plants stalking prey below the water surface. Meet the waterwheel (Aldrovanda vesiculosa). At first glance it looks rather unassuming but closer inspection will reveal that this carnivore is well equipped for capturing unsuspecting prey. 

The waterwheel never bothers with roots. Instead, it lives out its life as a free floating sprig, its stem it covered in whorls of filamentous leaves, each tipped with a tiny trap. The trapping mechanism is a bit different from its bladderwort neighbors. Instead of bladders, the waterwheel produces snap traps that closely resemble those of the Venus fly trap (Dionaea muscipula). These traps function in a similar way. When zooplankton or even a small fish trigger the bristles along the rim, the trap snaps shut and begins the digestion process.


This similarity to the Venus fly trap is more than superficial. DNA analysis reveals that they are in fact close cousins. Together with the sundews, these plants make up the family Droseraceae. The evolutionary history of this clade is a bit confusing thanks to a limited fossil record. Today, the waterwheel is the only extant member of the genus Aldrovanda but fossilized seeds and pollen reveal that this group was once a bit more diverse during the Eocene. Whenever these genera diverged, it happened a long time ago and little evidence of it remains.


At one point in time, the waterwheel could be found growing in wetland habitats throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, and even Australia. Today it is considered at risk of extinction. Its numbers have been severely reduced thanks to wetland degradation and destruction. Of the 379 known historical populations, only about 50 remain in tact today and many of these are in rough shape. Agricultural and industrial runoff are exacting a significant toll on its long term survival. To make matters worse, sexual reproduction in the waterwheel is a rare event. Most often this plant reproduces vegetatively, reducing genetic diversity. What's more, natural dispersal into new habitats is extremely limited. 


Oddly enough, populations of this plant have popped up in a few locations in eastern North America. These introductions were not a mistake either. Carnivorous plant enthusiasts concerned with the plight of this species in its native habitat began introducing it into water ways in New Jersey, New York, and Virginia where it is now established. Oddly enough, these introductions have performed far better than any of the reintroduction attempts made in its native range in Europe. Of course, this is always cause for concern. Endangered or not, the introduction of a species into new habitat is always risky. Still, there is hope yet for this species. Its popularity among plant growers has led to an increase in numbers in cultivation. At least folks have learned how to cultivate it until more comprehensive and effective conservation measures can be put into place. 

Photo Credits: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Further Reading: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]