Flower Mimics The Smell of Dying Honey Bees to Attract Pollinators

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Pollinator deception is rampant in the plant world. There are serious advantages in tricking your pollinators into thinking they are getting a reward without actually providing one. We have discussed sexual deception in the past ([1] [2]), as well as a case of food deception but a recent discovery has shed light on a new form of food deception in the flowering plant world. It is a strategy that has evolved in a distant relative of the milkweeds and it involves smelling like a dying bee. 

The plant in question here is known scientifically as Ceropegia sandersonii. It is a vining species native to South Africa. Like the rest of the members of this genus, C. sandersonii produces bizarrely beautiful flowers that function as pitfall traps. Insects attracted to these blossoms fall down inside and remain trapped for a period of time. As they scramble around inside they inevitably pick up packets of pollen called pollinia. After about a day of imprisonment, the flowers begin to wilt, releasing the insects inside. With any luck these insects will be duped by yet another flower of the same species, and thus pollination is achieved.

How this group of vines goes about attracting potential pollinators varies but, in the case of C. sandersonii, it means smelling like prey. This interesting species requires a unique group of kleptoparasitic flies for pollination. Kleptoparasites are any species that make their living by stealing food from other organisms. The flies in question specialize on sucking the juices out of bees that have been attacked by spiders. As the spider liquefies the hapless bee, these flies sneak in and get their fill.

The researchers noticed these flies were frequent visitors of C. sandersonii flowers so they decided to take a closer look at the chemicals responsible for floral scent. Chemical analyses revealed that the compounds released by the flowers were surprisingly similar to those released by a dying honey bee. In fact, roughly 60% of these compounds were an exact match. What's more, the team hopes that they will discover even more unique forms of food mimicry within this genus.

Photo Credits: [1] [2]

Further Reading: [1]